Tuesday, February 22, 2011

'FAIR PRIMROSE' (February Flower of the Month)

“O fairest flower, no sooner blown but blasted,

Soft silken primrose fading timelessly.”


~ John Milton





INDOOR PRIMROSE GARDEN


Although the primrose flower is native to areas of Europe and Asia, they can be found growing in abundance throughout the Midwest and Northwest regions of North America. Primulaceae, or the primrose family, contains around 24 genera of popular garden and wild-growing plants. There are a number of different varieties of primrose flowers; however, most gardeners place them in two distinct groups: the bog and woodland flowers, which prefer moist, rich soil, and the rocky area flowers, which do well in dry areas. These flowers are generally planted for ground cover and may be seen growing as single-headed flowers or in large clusters. Their colors range from the traditional yellow to white, purple, pink, and occasionally even coral hues.

The oils of the primrose flower are commercially cultivated in at least 15 countries. This is understandable as it has become a staple in many supplements. The oils of this flower contain gamma linolenic acid, linoleic acid and essential fatty acids which are thought to positively effect cholesterol and blood pressure, premenstrual symptoms, arthritis and the immune system. The oil is also said to be very effective in other areas as well. For example, rubbing the oils into door frames or dripping it around garden perimeters may help avert bees, as the scent is thought to be a deterrent. Given that the primrose flower is considered one of the symbols of purity, many real life and mythological stories tell of their association with children. For instance, these flowers were frequently planted on the grave sites of small children in Victorian England, as they represented the unchanging innocence of the lost child; in German myth, children were enticed into the halls of the goddess Bertha by way of the pale, delicate flowers. The flower’s myth, however, is not entirely somber. This blossom is associated with the Norse goddess Freya – who is the symbol of youthfulness, refinement, fertility and beauty. They are also seen in Celtic myth which states a patch of these flowers can mark the gateway to the fairy realms.

As well as being a symbol of purity, the primrose flower is said to represent both February births and the month of May. They are also thought to symbolize courage in the face of adversity, devotion, love and renewal. As a gift, these flowers are frequently presented to long time loves, as they are a great way to represent passing through many years of struggle, only to find yourself just as happy as you ever were with your partner.

(http://flowerinfo.org/)

OUTDOOR PRIMROSE GARDEN

Evening Primrose



Primrose Garden


The Primrose (Primula) is a gift that just keeps giving ...
as both an indoor garden then planted outside

24 comments:

Andrea said...

Hello Joey, that's a very beautiful primrose garden, so rich in colors and varieties. And your collages are lovely too, i am inspired again to try those layouts, haha!

Scott said...

You have such a talent for putting together the most beautiful montages. Just awesome.

Carol said...

Dear Joey, You make me long for these sweet faces! The luscious and vibrant colors are so welcome at this time of snow and cold of snow and cold. Gorgeous collages!!

Rob (ourfrenchgarden) said...

Ah it won't be long. Spring just around the corner. When they pop up in the lawn, it gives me a perfect reason not to bother to cut it.

Beautiful images (as always)by the way

Donna said...

love my primroses here in the snowy NE US...I have many different types as well and they are the bright faces of spring!!

kanak7 said...

Joey...you know I keep raving about your collages but these must be the most spectacular ones! So much variety in colour!!! Glad you included the symbolism of the primroses...very interesting! BTW, I can't choose a favourite! They're all so incredibly beautiful!!!

p3chandan said...

Wow! Have never seen so gorgeous primrose flowers before, only taking the evening primrose oil capsules as supplement! Beautiful mosaics of primroses!

Gatsbys Gardens said...

Beautiful collages and interesting information on the Primrose. I buy them every year around this time but don't have much luck with them coming back the following year.

Eileen

Carolyn @ Carolyn's Shade Gardens said...

Joey, Your collages of primroses are just spectacular and your post is very informative. I love primroses and specialize in them at my nursery. I especially like Japanese woodland primrose because it is revered in Japan and has over 500 cultivars. Carolyn

Edith Hope said...

Dearest Joey, Perhaps I am just an old traditionalist......or, perhaps, just old.......but I am not very fond of the modern coloured Primula hybrids. For me, I love to see drifts of pale yelow Primroses [often in England on damp, grassy banks], just naturalised in the wild.

I do so love your idea of a Croquet Party. Yes, May would be perfect or, perhaps, June in chillier England, with everyone in tones and tints of cream and languishing about.....roll on summer!!

Rosey said...

How funny! I just took my vitamin and it has this very same oil in it.

Such charming colleges! I love those pink primroses. Flower power to the max!

joey said...

Thanks Andrea. Your collages are stunning too!

How kind, Scott. Thank you.

Thank you, Carol. I'm longing for their faces in my garden too. For now, am happy to enjoy them inside.

Good job, Rob :) Thank you.

Agree, Donna. A cheery gift :)

You are so sweet, Kanak, Thank you.

How kind, p3chandan, and why it's a joy to visit each other's gardens.

Don't give up, Eileen. Perhaps this might be the year!

Thank you, Carolyn. I adore Japanese primrose. What a joy it would be to visit your nursery ... in PA correct! How far are you from Yardley (my niece lives there).

Agree, dearest Edith, naturalized are indeed lovely and I would love to drive through the English countryside beside you and comment on their beauty. Besides croquet, I celebrate the May garden with May wine, a tradition many crave! Yes, roll on spring ... looking outside at the heavy blanket of snow covering my beds (more to come) I'm more than ready!

Thanks, Rosey. Anxious when primrose begin blooming in my outdoor garden, often through the snow.

Carolyn @ Carolyn's Shade Gardens said...

Joey, I am about 40 miles from Yardley and would love it if you dropped by if you are in the area. Some bloggers are going to meet at my nursery this spring, probably in April if you are around then. Carolyn

imac said...

Beautiful and rich in colour my friend.

joey said...

Thanks, Carolyn. How fun would that be! Unfortunately I won't be there but will pass info on to my talented (also loves to garden) niece, Susie Morrell, a member of the Daily Painters of Pennsylvania (http://dailypaintersofpennsylvania.blogspot.com/). Aw, thoughts of spring are wondrous!

How kind, imac. Thank you.

ONG said...

Wow! Um, wow! The colors are off the charts beautiful. My eyes need time to recover now. Thanks for posting!

Rick said...

These are beauties, joey ! (It's always a pleasure coming here and getting caught up a bit again). I have some evening primrose in my garden back in Canada - well, waiting under the snow. Thanks for all the interesting information about them too.

joey said...

Beats my panoramic view of white snow, ONG! This awaits me in couple of months! Thanks for the kind comment.

Mine are still asleep under a blanket of snow too, Rick (and more on the way).

Rose said...

Very interesting, Joey! I love the colors of primroses--some of them are so intense they look as if someone had taken a paintbrush to them. My favorite thing about primroses, though, is that they're usually one of the first flowers to appear in my garden every spring--I'm looking forward to seeing them very soon, I hope.

sweetbay said...

What beautiful collages!! I especially like the one with the clock in it. The colors are so lovely and such a feast for the eyes.

joey said...

My heart is with you, Rose. Primrose are brave souls ... often stunned to see their vivid faces peaking up through the white snow.

Thank you, Sweetbay. I love my garden clock, a long ago Mother's Day gift from my children.

Kala said...

Such joyous colors Joey - they lift my spirits! Thank you so much for sharing these beautiful images.

Gail said...

Dear Joey, What a stunning array of pretty flowers. My favorites are the Evening Primrose. I've never thought to add the delicate ones that make me think of English gardens to my little bit difficult garden! gail

joey said...

You are a dear, Kala. Thank you.

Thanks Gail. Do you have Evening Primrose in your garden? A bit invasive, they find themselves happy almost anywhere and everywhere. Now, the delicate primrose stay put on the sunny hillside, especially cheery in my 'Primrose Lane'.